Archives For Theology

Morning Glory

“There is not in the world a kind of life more sweet and delightful, than that of a continual conversation with God; those only can comprehend it who practice and experience it.” Brother Lawrence

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“Prayer at its highest is a two-way conversation – and for me the most important part is listening to God’s replies.” Frank C. Laubach

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“I pray because I can’t help myself. I pray because I’m helpless. I pray because the need flows out of me all the time – waking and sleeping. It doesn’t change God – it changes me.” William Nicholson

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Over-complicating God

September 12, 2012 — Leave a comment

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

God is pretty complex. There’s a lot to him. After all, he made the universe and everything in it, knows the numbers of hairs on each of our heads, and knows what has been, what is, and what will be.

The Trinity of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit exists in perfect harmony, is the same but different.

Frankly, I don’t really get it.

I did a theology degree, and took modules in how to understand God, and I still don’t.

Sometimes, this frustrates me. I want to be able to logically formulate why God loves me, and why he forgives me. I want to find some theologians who back me up, academics who I can name-drop when I need to. I don’t know if it’s because I sometimes find it hard to fathom God’s love, but I find myself trying to produce a formula to prove it.

God = creator. Jesus = creator’s son. Spirit = creator’s presence on earth now. (I’ve probably said some heresies already). God loves us. You. Me. Jesus died for us. The Spirit came for us. God + love + Jesus + his death + coming of the Spirit = salvation.

That’s not even close.

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I think I spend too much time trying to explain and understand God, and not enough time enjoying him and loving him.

There’s no doubt there is a time and a place for trying to understand God, for theology and exegesis and picking apart the story of Jesus.

Ultimately, however, I think God wants us to love him. Wants us to believe his promises, to trust him, to shelter in his grace.

Sometimes, it’s that simple. The life we get in return isn’t always easy or straightforward. More often than not, it’s the opposite.

But through it all, God reminds us of his love, and longs for us to love him with all we have.

His message to me, and to all of us, is simple.

I have done, and will do, anything for you. You are my child. Take shelter in me. I love you.

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“No one’s ever seen or heard anything like this, never so much as imagined anything quite like it – what God has arranged for those who love him.” 1 Corinthians 2:9, The Message

Theological Completion

January 14, 2011 — 2 Comments

I didn’t blog over Christmas. I felt I needed a break. And honestly, I had nothing really to say, which is fine. So rather than write something for the sake of it, I just kept quiet. Ecclesiastes 5.2 and all.

There’s been something on my mind lately, however. In Christian circles these days, there’s a lot of talk of ‘complete’ and ‘incomplete’ theology. Some prominent Christians are said to have complete theologies, others are said to have incomplete theologies. And whilst I know what is meant by these statements, I wonder sometimes what they really mean.

The picture above is one that is commonly used to depict the Trinity. It’s quite effective, because it’s three sections all linked together, which is like the Trinity. However, it is incomplete. Because it is not God. There is nothing we have that is a perfect example of the Trinity, except the Trinity. I like that, because it means that we can’t fully comprehend God and compartmentalise Him down to small, world-friendly chunks.

So whilst I understand what is meant by complete and incomplete theologies, I wonder if there is such a thing as a complete theology. I’m not trying to suggest some people are right, and others wrong. I’m also very keen to ensure that the church has an accurate, Scriptural theology.

I just wonder if the terminology is helpful. Maybe it is. I just wonder, that’s all.